Question: Can You Say More Accurate?

What is another word for higher?

What is another word for higher?tallerloftierbiggergranderlargergreaterhugerimmensersuperiormore134 more rows.

Is so much correct?

The difference between so much and so many is similar to the difference between much and many. So much is used before singular uncountable nouns. So many is used before plural nouns. I have never seen so much wealth in my life.

Is more accurate grammatically correct?

4 Answers. “More correct” is acceptable (especially in the adverbial form “More correctly”). That said, you will usually see “More accurate” instead. “More correct” is certainly used when talking of forms of address.

What is a good sentence for accurate?

Obtaining accurate and timely information continued to be our Achilles heel. If he hadn’t been so accurate, it might have been amusing. When she returns from a walk and tells some one about it, her descriptions are accurate and vivid. In reading the lips she is not so quick or so accurate as some reports declare.

Is much more proper English?

The OP’s sentence is grammatically correct. You use “much more” in front of an uncountable noun. Another example: I need much more time to do this job. On the other hand, you use “many more” in front of plural nouns such as I have many more friends in this city.

What is another word for not accurate?

SYNONYMS FOR inaccurate inexact, loose; erroneous, wrong, faulty.

Is give me it correct grammar?

The latter form is grammatically correct in every case, but in some dialects the former (without a preposition) is considered ungrammatical, or at least unnatural-sounding, when both objects are pronouns (as in He gave me it).

Is more bad correct?

No because worse is already the comparative form of the word ‘bad’. … More and most are often used when the word in question doesn’t have its own comparative or superlative form.

Is much higher correct?

No, neither of these forms are correct. Something is better, or higher. These words are already in comparative form, so there’s no need to use “more” with them. … You can use “much” with a comparative to make it stronger.

What does very accurate mean?

Something that is accurate is exact and true. It’s important to be accurate in the kitchen with your measurements and in the courtroom with your testimony. The adjective accurate comes from the Latin roots ad curare, meaning “to take care,” and that is precisely what you do when you make sure something is accurate.

What is the difference between precise and accurate?

Accuracy refers to how close measurements are to the “true” value, while precision refers to how close measurements are to each other.

Is it much better or more better?

“much better” is correct, meaning “a lot better” or “a great deal better”. For example: “I feel much better now” or “I am much better at English than I am at mathematics”. “more better” and “much more better” are incorrect.

Is aren’t we all grammatically correct?

4 Answers. No, you can’t say “are not we all?”. It is ungrammatical, as you suggest. Yes, you can say either “you need not go there” or “you needn’t go there”.

What are the most common grammar mistakes?

Common Grammar MistakesThey’re vs. Their vs. There.Your vs. You’re.Its vs. It’s.Incomplete Comparisons.Passive Voice.Dangling Modifiers.Referring to a Brand or Entity as ‘They’Possessive Nouns.More items…•

Which is more correct grammatically?

“More correct” is acceptable (especially in the adverbial form “More correctly”). That said, you will usually see “More accurate” instead. “More correct” is certainly used when talking of forms of address.

What does accurate mean in English?

adjective. free from error or defect; consistent with a standard, rule, or model; precise; exact.

What is correct sentence?

In order for a sentence to be grammatically correct, the subject and verb must both be singular or plural. In other words, the subject and verb must agree with one another in their tense.

Is Higher an adjective?

higher (adjective) higher education (noun) higher learning (noun) … higher–up (noun)